Best Country: Medicine in the different countries

Kiribati Health Care and Vaccinations

Health insurance is strongly recommended. Tungaru Central Hospital on Tarawa provides medical service to all the islands. Government dispensaries on all islands are equipped to handle minor ailments and injuries. Visitors should bring their own supply of basic medicines with them.

Healthcare in Lithuania

Lithuania provides free state-funded healthcare to all citizens and registered long-term residents. Private healthcare is also available in the country. The standard of healthcare in the country needs investment, but medical staff are well qualified, with Lithuania’s cardiologists being the most advanced in the former Soviet bloc.

Healthcare in Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein has an excellent standard of compulsory state funded healthcare. Medical staff are extremely well trained and healthcare in the country is available to all citizens and registered residents. Private healthcare is also available here.

Healthcare in Macedonia

Macedonia has an improving standard of compulsory state funded healthcare, which is available free to all citizens and registered long-term residents. Private healthcare is also available in the country.

Healthcare in Malta

Malta has an excellent standard of state funded healthcare. Medical staff are extremely well trained and healthcare in Malta is available free to all citizens and registered long-term residents. Private healthcare thrives in this country and co-exists with the state system.

Moldova Health

The Moldova health care system has improved immensely over the years but still there is less availability of modern equipments in the hospitals of Moldova.

Healthcare in Monaco

Monaco has an excellent standard of compulsory state funded healthcare. Medical staff are extremely well trained and healthcare in Monaco is available to all citizens, registered long-term residents and those citizens from France and Italy who can prove that they have paid their healthcare contributions in one of these countries.

Healthcare in Netherlands

After 2006, the people of the Netherlands have witnessed a significant reform in its healthcare industry. As a result, a new dual-system was formed. The first one is the social insurance.

Healthcare in Norway

Norway has an excellent standard of compulsory state funded healthcare. Medical staff are extremely well trained and healthcare in the country is available to all citizens and registered long-term residents. Private healthcare is also available. The Ministry of Health determines healthcare policy and oversees the state system. Healthcare policy is executed by five health regions and the municipalities.

Healthcare in Russia

With 17 million km2 of surface area, the Russian Federation is the largest country in the world. It is rich in natural resources, having major deposits of oil, natural gas, coal, timber and an assortment of minerals.

An introduction to healthcare in Kuwait

The quality of health care in Kuwait is generally high and equal to that in western Europe and the USA, except for highly specialised treatment.Owing to Kuwait’s small population and the numerous medical facilities in the private and public sectors, long waiting lists are almost unheard of.

Healthcare in Laos

Laos has a rustic appeal to many travellers who enjoy getting away from the sealed and packaged amenities of the West.

Healthcare in Malaysia

Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country with thirteen states, consisting of two different geographical regions that are divided by the South China Sea.

Healthcare in Turks and Caicos

Turks and Caicos is one of many British overseas territories in the Caribbean and is a popular spot for expats and tourists because of the climate, beaches and lifestyle. The economy relies heavily on the offshore finance industry. Most tourists visit the main area of Providenciales, nicknamed Provo.

Jamaica Healthcare

Jamaica has developed a large and complex public network of primary care centres and hospitals around the country, offering an extensive array of services, frequently for free or below cost. The rising costs of healthcare resources, which are largely imported, and devaluation of the Jamaican currency have widened the gap between available and required resources.